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SAIO 50 for 50: Lesley Kabotie

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This Week's Spotlight:  Lesley Kabotie ('88, B.A. Anthropology)

Lesley Kabotie

Kabotie (Crow Tribe of Montana) is President of Indigenous Collaboration, Inc. a company offering consensus-based processes for effective collaboration within Tribal governments, enterprises, native communities and non-profits. N8VInsights, a project of the company, rounds out Kabotie’s work to facilitate the social, economic and political impact of indigenous people nationally by ensuring native participation in mainstream inquiries that inform national policy and resource allocation. Kabotie currently serves her Nation as commissioner of the Apsaalooke Nation Housing Authority and as founder of a community development nonprofit in her district. A Master Facilitator, Kabotie designs conferences, meetings and planning sessions to facilitate effective group participation, analysis and decision-making.

Kabotie works locally, regionally and nationally with Tribal Governments, Tribal communities, private foundations, non-profits and federal agencies, to align resources, formulate policy, problem solve and respond to the priorities of native nations and native populations in rural and urban centers. Kabotie’s experience spans community development and crisis response in all areas on the priority spectrum of native Nations and populations. She believes that the most appropriate and durable responses to Indian Country’s challenges are derived from effective engagement of the People themselves.

In addition to her Stanford degree, Kabotie received her master’s in Non-Profit Management from Regis University. 

Lesley's Interview

Content Lesley shared regarding experiences with a former Native American Cultural Center staff member that occurred around the time of her undergraduate career has been shared with Stanford's Title IX and Human Resources Offices to confirm that reporting occurred and appropriate actions were taken.