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Kaorihiva

Student Life

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Undergraduate Students

The Native undergraduate population at Stanford is both numerous and diverse. 

Approximately 400 indigenous undergrads (including transfers) attend Stanford having come from most of the States ranging from northernmost Alaska to as far away as Palau, French Polynesia, and New Zealand.  Full-bloods, mixed bloods, and mixed ethnicity from reservation and rural homes, inner city, and international locations--their academic interests span the full range of those offered at Stanford. 

Our undergraduate student organizations include:

  • Cultural: Alaska Native Student Organization, Diné Club, Hui o Nā Moku, Indigenous Peoples in the Social Sciences and Humanities (IPSSAH), Kaorihiva, Marianas Club, Northern Plains Awareness, Pueblos of the Southwest, Stanford Powwow, Tribes of the Southeast
  • Career: American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES), Natives in Medicine (NIM), Natives in Pre-Law (SNIPL)
  • Community Groups: Stanford American Indian Organization, Big & Little Siblings Program, Indigenous Queers, Muwekma-Tah-Ruk Residents, Native Languages at Stanford, Native Men's Group/Native Women's Group, Stanford Native and Indigenous Lifting 

Graduate Students 

The diverse Native graduate and professional school student population of approximately 100 has come to Stanford from a wide range of undergraduate institutions.  Once here to pursue their masters, doctorate, professional degrees (or for a postdoctoral appointment) they span all seven schools: Business, Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences, Education, Engineering, Humanities and Sciences, Law, or Medicine. 

Our graduate student organizations include: 

  • Career: Native American Law Student Association (NALSA), Stanford American Indigenous Medical Students (SAIMS), Native Business Student Association
  • Community Groups: Stanford Native American Graduate Students, Stanford Indigenous Alumni Association