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American Indian Staff Forum (AISF)

The American Indian Staff Forum (AISF) is a community of American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian staff and faculty at Stanford University, Stanford University Medical Center and Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.  AISF is one of many  staff groups for employees within the Stanford community.  AISF's goal is to be an educational resource to the university, to other ethnic staff organizations, and to local and national Native American groups.

American Indian Staff Forum (AISF) Recent News

2017 Recipients of the Annual Anne Ninham Medicine Mentorship Award, Naomi Brown and Virgil Moorehead of Stanford’s Counseling and Psychological Services.

Dear Native Community, Friends, and Colleagues,

On behalf of the American Indian Staff Forum and Greg Graves, AISF Chair, it is my pleasure to announce that this year’s recipients of the annual Anne Ninham Medicine Mentorship Award are Naomi Brown and Virgil Moorehead of Stanford’s Counseling and Psychological Services.

The announcement was made at the Annual Native Student and Mentor Dinner on Thursday, March 2, 2017. AISF Chair, Greg Graves shared the following tribute: “The Anne Ninham Medicine Award is typically bestowed on a single individual, but this year a team of mentors uniquely merits our recognition together."

Both are members of Stanford’s American Indian Staff Forum (AISF). Both are Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) liaisons to the Native Community. Both are imbedded in our spaces to provide convenient, community-based counseling to students. Both facilitate empowering dialogues through Men’s and Women’s Talking Circles. Both empower Native students to tell their stories.

Drs. Naomi Brown and Virgil Moorehead together champion Native-centered wellness and resilience. They are integral partners in the Native Family and the campus support network for students. We honor their extraordinary service to and passion for community wellness. Please join me in recognizing Naomi and Virgil as this year’s Anne Ninham Medicine Mentorship Award recipients.

Naomi’s and Virgil’s names are now engraved on the perpetual Anne Medicine Mentorship Award plaque displayed in the Native American Cultural Center. At last Thursday’s dinner, Naomi and Virgil were presented with framed certificates and the promise of a cash prizes to follow. Congratulations to both recipients!

Thanks to everyone that continues to make these events successful.

Sincerely,
Denni Dianne Woodward (Mescalero Apache)
Assistant Dean of Student Affairs & Associate Director
Native American Cultural Center/American Indian, Alaska Native & Native Hawaiian Program

More about The American Indian Staff Forum (AISF)

Mission

The American Indian Staff Forum (AISF) is a group of American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian staff and faculty at Stanford University, Stanford University Medical Center and Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. 

The purpose of our organization is twofold:  first, to help to provide community for all members of AISF and to advocate for issues of concern to Native Americans, and ; second to be an educational resource to the University, other ethnic staff organizations and local and national Native American groups.

About the AISF Community

Picture of the American Indian Staff Forum's Annual Holiday Dinner at Buca de Beppo, December 2009The American Indian Staff Forum's Annual Holiday Dinner at Buca de Beppo, December 2009

AISF organizes several events including monthly brown bag lunch meetings at the Native American Cultural Center,  quarterly off-campus socials or field trips, an annual holiday dinner, the annual Pamcake Breakfast for newly-arrived Stanford freshmen during Stanford Admit Weekend, the quarterly Pam Hanitchak Lecture Series and the Anne Ninham Medicine Mentorship Award.

The Pam Hanitchak Lecture Series is a series of lunchtime meetings hosted during the school year at the Native American Cultural Center in the Clubhouse.  Past speakers have included Tom Arviso, Jr (Knight Fellow and Editor of The Navajo Times), Suzanne Abel (Director of Development at the Haas Center for Public Service) and Dr. Kenneth Fields (Professor of English).  Pam Hanitchak (Cherokee) was a founder of the American Indian Staff Forum.  This ongoing lecture series honors her dedication to strengthening our American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian community at Stanford.

For more information about the American Indian Staff Forum, please contact:

About the AISF Anne Medicine Mentorship Award

Dean Eyre receives AISF Anne Medicine Mentorship Award  and is congratulated by Jarrid Whitney (2/23/05)Dean Eyre receives AISF Anne Medicine Mentorship Award and is congratulated by Jarrid Whitney (2/23/05)

The Anne Ninham Medicine Mentorship Award was established by the AISF to honor retired staff member Anne Medicine's legacy of mentoring and to encourage others to strive for the depth of her commitment.  The annual award serves as an on-going reminder of Anne and her contributions to Stanford and the campus Native American community.  Past recipients of the award are Jim Larimore, 1999; Denni Woodward, 2000; Matthew Snipp, 2001 and Jarrid Whitney, 2002.  A perpetual plaque in the Native American Cultural Center records the history of each year's winner.

Anne Ninham Medicine biography, as printed in 6/13/97 Stanford Daily.

Anne Medicine announced her retirement effective May 31, 1997. (Anne Medicine passed away on February 14, 2002.)

"Over the past 16 years, Anne has served the University in several capacities, as Assistant Dean of Graduate Studies, advisor to the Native American Cultural Center, and Assistant Dean on the Dean's staff at the medical school. In 1991, she joined the Vice President for Student Affairs staff as the Graduate Recruiter for American Indian and Alaska Native students in Stanford's professional and graduate schools.

"Anne's outreach and recruitment efforts have been a major factor in increasing the number of Native American and Alaska Native students matriculating at and graduating from Stanford. She has spread the word about the University to American Indian and Alaska Native communities across the country. During her time at Stanford, she has worked with many national Indian organizations and served as an educational consultant to many tribes. Most importantly, Anne has played a significant role in students' lives through her work in developing a strong Native community presence on campus. Among her many contributions, she helped bring artist-in-resident Linda Poolaw to campus to work with students on a Kiowa ethno-photography project and exhibit. She has been an ardent supporter of the Stanford Powwow, led the effort to establish a traditional sweat lodge, and played a critical role in campus discussions concerning the return of human remains from the University to the Muwekma Ohlone Indian tribe and worked with faculty to develop the Zuni at Stanford program. Anne has been a respected elder in the campus community, and the nation, and served as an important and cherished mentor to many Indian and non-Indian students, faculty, and staff. Anne is a member of the Seneca / Oneida / Mohawk Nations. Before coming to Stanford, she worked with tribal organizations in New York, South Dakota, and Canada. Anne attended Haskell Institute in Lawrence, Kansas, and received her Master of Education degree and Certificate of Advanced Study at Harvard University.

"Both to honor Anne's legacy of mentoring and encourage other to strive for the depth of her commitment, the American Indian Staff Forum has established the Anne Ninham Medicine Mentorship Award. Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary describes mentor as a "trusted counselor or guide, tutor, or coach" but it's hard to imagine anyone defining mentor better than Anne Medicine. This role constituted a significant portion of her Stanford career as Assistant Dean for Student Resources in the Division of Graduate Studies and Research; after the decentralization of Graduate Studies, Anne served as Director of Native American Graduate Student Recruitment and Retention, reporting directly to the Vice Provost of Student Affairs."

"This award is an on-going reminder of Anne and her contributions to Stanford and the campus Native American community. This will be an annual award, with the first winner tentatively set to be selected from nominees in January, 1998. A perpetual plaque in the (Native American Cultural) Center will record the history of this honor and each year's winner will receive a certificate and cash prize."